Forests Ontario

Community Events

Believe it or not, Ontario needs more trees!

Believe it or not, Ontario needs more trees!

Rob Keen, RPF CEO – Forests Ontario February 20, 2019 – Having spent my life surrounded by trees, – 40 years in a professional capacity – I know when our forests are healthy, they provide an impressive range of services and benefits. While the value of our forest’s ability to sequester carbon and mitigate the... Read More

Free Tree Planting Workshops for Ontario Landowners

Posted: February 15, 2019

  Toronto, ON (February 15, 2019) – Forests Ontario wants landowners to consider the benefits of large-scale tree planting. The non-profit organization will be hosting seven free tree planting workshops across the province, in partnership with local planting delivery agencies, during February and March of 2019. WHO: Forests Ontario, Local Planting Delivery Agencies, Local Landowners... Read More

2016-17 Annual Report

2016-17 Annual Report

Over the past year and a half, Forests Ontario has focused on growth. It’s at the heart of what we do, whether by growing and restoring our forests or improving as an organization. We’ve made great strides in promoting and supporting the future of healthy forests through our tree planting, educational programs, and awareness campaigns,... Read More

Ontario Envirothon Alumni Profile: David Lawless

Ontario Envirothon Alumni Profile: David Lawless

Posted: February 15, 2019

The Ontario Envirothon program helps to prepare students for post-secondary education and careers in the environmental sciences, and refines their interpersonal and teamwork skills.  More than that, though, it touches the lives of its participants—fueling a passion for the environment and sparking friendships. In this series, a number of Envirothon alumni will be profiled to give... Read More

Webinar: Towards Understanding The Influence Of Headwater Catchments On Water Availability In The Athabasca River Basin

March 21st, 2019

Determining the redistribution and storage of water between and among forested hillslopes, wetlands and watercourses is key to understanding runoff at a larger scale. Although the topography of the Western Boreal Plain is generally low relief, upland landforms (small “mountains”) are scattered throughout. In spite of their relatively small areal extent, these mountains likely have a disproportionately large hydrological impact. However, there are not many instrumented catchments on these landforms to understand their function.

In this talk, I will introduce the Stony Mountain Headwater Catchment Observatory, which comprises 5 small (<10 km2) headwater catchments ~40 km south of Fort McMurray; the first of its kind in the lower Athabasca River Basin. I will describe these catchments and some of the innovative technologies that we are using to collect data from the field, as well as present some findings that highlight the importance of northern Alberta’s “mountains” and wetlands on sustaining water flows in local streams and regional rivers in the Athabasca River Basin.

Link
www.eventbrite.ca
Email
wbf_bmp@ducks.ca

Seed Forecasting

Forests Ontario has established a seed forecasting database to monitor and better track seed availability for future planting use. In order to continue and better this tracking process, we need our partners and the public’s support in providing seed report information.

Here’s how you can get involved in seed forecasting.